michisama2030:

masykruger:

michisama2030:

thats one of the reasons why did my classmates think that i was a little bit weird

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actually, after some time they got used to my live-reference-needs

it reminded me about one funny incident lmao

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IT GOT BETTER

Reblogged from Rouge of Mind

luna-calamity:

lifebyjorge:

neodarkstar:

trigonyan:

FUCK YOU I ACTUALLY CRIED

This is the absolute BESTcomic I’ve ever read on this website.

And i just cried…so hard…

I EXPECTED THIS TO BE FUNNY AND SILLY BUT MY HEART

Reblogged from Rapupapada
Reblogged from My Blog
Reblogged from Rapupapada

Passive aggressive Witch

baltharus:

I don’t curse people, I bless everyone around them.

Reblogged from My Blog
femalegaze:

schmurple:

think-progress:

Arizona Professor Offers Extra Credit To Female Students Who Stop Shaving Their Armpits

Professor Breanne Fahs offers female students extra-credit if they “stop shaving their legs and underarms for ten weeks during the semester while keeping a journal to document their experiences.” For Fahs, who teaches women and gender studies, the purpose is to get students thinking critically about societal norms and gender roles.A similar opportunity is available to men in Fahs’ classes who recieve extra credit for shaving all of their hair from the neck down.One student, Stephanie Robinson, described it as a “life-changing experience:"Many of my friends didn’t want to work out next to me or hear about the assignment, and my mother was distraught at the idea that I would be getting married in a white dress with armpit hair. I also noticed the looks on faces of strangers and people around campus who seemed utterly disgusted by my body hair. It definitely made me realize that if you’re not strictly adhering to socially prescribed gender roles, your body becomes a site for contestation and public opinion."

They published a paper about this the first time someone did it, and it showed that non-white young women experienced a lot more pressure from friends and relatives to remove their hair. The authors suggested that because beauty standards are white - long, fine, flowy blonde hair, blue eyes, etc, etc - his body hair non-conformity was more troubling in WOC, as they crossed yet another boundary of femininity. They were also more likely to have darker or thicker body hair, so it would stand out more than on the blonde women, for example. For me that sort of exemplifies why it’s so important to have multiple, intersectional feminisms. Because “let’s not shave our legs!” might be a powerful and important message, but it’s ultimately one of white privilege that sort of ignores the whiteness of these beauty standards in the first place.

femalegaze:

schmurple:

think-progress:

Arizona Professor Offers Extra Credit To Female Students Who Stop Shaving Their Armpits

Professor Breanne Fahs offers female students extra-credit if they “stop shaving their legs and underarms for ten weeks during the semester while keeping a journal to document their experiences.” For Fahs, who teaches women and gender studies, the purpose is to get students thinking critically about societal norms and gender roles.
A similar opportunity is available to men in Fahs’ classes who recieve extra credit for shaving all of their hair from the neck down.
One student, Stephanie Robinson, described it as a “life-changing experience:
"Many of my friends didn’t want to work out next to me or hear about the assignment, and my mother was distraught at the idea that I would be getting married in a white dress with armpit hair. I also noticed the looks on faces of strangers and people around campus who seemed utterly disgusted by my body hair. It definitely made me realize that if you’re not strictly adhering to socially prescribed gender roles, your body becomes a site for contestation and public opinion."

They published a paper about this the first time someone did it, and it showed that non-white young women experienced a lot more pressure from friends and relatives to remove their hair. The authors suggested that because beauty standards are white - long, fine, flowy blonde hair, blue eyes, etc, etc - his body hair non-conformity was more troubling in WOC, as they crossed yet another boundary of femininity. They were also more likely to have darker or thicker body hair, so it would stand out more than on the blonde women, for example. 

For me that sort of exemplifies why it’s so important to have multiple, intersectional feminisms. Because “let’s not shave our legs!” might be a powerful and important message, but it’s ultimately one of white privilege that sort of ignores the whiteness of these beauty standards in the first place.

Reblogged from ~Gloop Gloop~
albinwonderland:

sunspotpony:

shugarskull:

thisisemobuddy:

juliaofthepnw:

Whatever.

Go forth elven prince of the mountains

He must be a half elf because Elves can’t grow beards

Gimli and Legolas’s true son.

bless everything about this post

albinwonderland:

sunspotpony:

shugarskull:

thisisemobuddy:

juliaofthepnw:

Whatever.

Go forth elven prince of the mountains

He must be a half elf because Elves can’t grow beards

Gimli and Legolas’s true son.

bless everything about this post

tiniestofthesams:

hpotterobsession:

I love Alan Rickman. J.K. Rowling told him Snape’s entire background story before they filmed the first movie so that he would understand Snape’s character, now watching these movies a second or third+ time is so great, because then you see strange or subtle little things Snape does, facial expressions, odd glances, ect, and you can be like “Thats why he did that!”

Like here, he sees Harry, and you can tell he is noticing how much he resembles his father, but there is no doubt that he also saw Lily’s eyes there too, then he notices that Harry’s scar is bothering him, and looks suspiciously at Quirrel because he knows he could be up to something. He already hates Harry so much because he’s a constant reminder of the love he lost and who he lost her to, and yet he tries to keep him safe from the first second he sees him. He doesn’t even have to think about it, he sees that something could put Lily’s son in danger and he instantly starts to put the pieces together to keep him safe.

RULE NUMER ONE: EVERYTIME YOU SEE THIS IN YOUR DASH YOU HAVE TO REBLOG IT.

Not a fan of Snape as a character BUT DAT ACTING DOE

Reblogged from

socialpsychopathblr:

Sacra Luna

Reblogged from ~Gloop Gloop~